exercise and brain health

Exercise for a Healthy Brain

Senior Couple with Weights
Everyone knows how important it is to be physically active. Some of the many physical benefits of regular exercise include improved strength, flexibility, stamina, balance and coordination. Exercise can also help with managing weight and controlling risk factors for chronic diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, high cholesterol and stroke. On the other hand, lack of activity can have serious negative consequences. In addition to an overall poorer sense of well-being, older adults who are ...
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How Running Improves Memory Function

Couple Running with Dog
It is no secret that exercise has many benefits for both physical and mental well-being, and doctors have long been touting the value of aerobic exercise for both cardiovascular and brain health. Aerobic exercise has been shown to keep cognitive abilities from declining and reducing the risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Regular exercise is often credited with relieving stress, reducing risk of stroke, lowering blood sugar and improving balance and coordination. Scientists have also suggested that...
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Lifestyle, Positivity & Alzheimer’s

Studies, opinions and conjecture about causes and prevention of Alzheimer’s disease are hardly in short supply. It seems that every week, there is suspicion of a new contributing cause to the increasing rates of Alzheimer’s and dementia. In the last several years, everything from processed foods to genetics has been named as contributing factors, yet there is very little information that is conclusive. And to date, there is no single thing that we can point to and say “This is a definite cause o...
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Can Mild Exercise Delay Cognitive Decline?

Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Public Health recently found in a study that mild exercise, in the form of walking for 30 minutes four times per week, resulted in detectable changes in brain regions believed to be related to cognitive impairment. All study participants engaged in the same walking program for the three-month study. One group of participants was comprised of healthy elders, while a second group consisted of elders with mild cognitive impairment. Individuals in...
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