dementia

Alzheimer’s May Reduce Ability to Perceive Pain

brain power graphic
Researchers at Vanderbilt University recently reported in BMC Medicine that individuals with Alzheimer’s disease exhibited a reduced ability to detect and recognize pain. The three-year study at Vanderbilt examined two groups of adults aged 65 and older: one group diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease and a second group with no signs of Alzheimer’s. Participants were asked to report pain levels resulting from exposure to varying degrees of heat. The study revealed that reports of pain sensati...
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Social engagement may help slow dementia

According to new research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, public engagement and civic activity helps the memory center in aging brains maintain its size and in some cases even grow larger. This new research recently appeared in Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association and was drawn from a study of a Baltimore based program that matches retirees with young people in public schools to act as reading mentors. At two years in length, this s...
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Lifestyle, Positivity & Alzheimer’s

Studies, opinions and conjecture about causes and prevention of Alzheimer’s disease are hardly in short supply. It seems that every week, there is suspicion of a new contributing cause to the increasing rates of Alzheimer’s and dementia. In the last several years, everything from processed foods to genetics has been named as contributing factors, yet there is very little information that is conclusive. And to date, there is no single thing that we can point to and say “This is a definite cause o...
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Dementia and Sleep Issues

Sleep problems are often experienced by people with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia. It is not entirely clear why this is such a common issue with Alzheimer's disease and dementia, but scientists believe that, along with memory and behavior changes, the impact of Alzheimer's on the brain can also affect sleep. This may result in less time in deep sleep and more time awake at night. Additional difficulties may include excessive sleepiness or agitation during the day and abnormal movements or brea...
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5 Myths About Alzheimer’s

Myth 1: It only happens only to older people. While true that most people with Alzheimer’s are 65 and older, it can also happen when you’re young. Around 5% of people experience symptoms in their 30s, 40s, or 50s, which is called early-onset Alzheimer’s. Myth 2: Alzheimer’s is part of aging. A little memory loss is a normal part of aging. But true Alzheimer's symptoms, like memory loss, should not be lumped into that category. George Perry, MD, a neuroscientist and a member of the Alzheimer’s F...
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Warning Signs for Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease

With so much misinformation surrounding the conditions of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, it can be difficult to sort fact from fiction. If your loved one is getting more and more forgetful, is it just a normal part of aging or is it a sign of Alzheimer’s? If your loved one is becoming increasingly withdrawn socially, is this an indication of dementia, or could it be something else? Some behaviors that may point to early warning signs of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease can be hard to detect ...
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The Stages of Alzheimer’s

When an aging loved one starts getting forgetful, misplacing things or repeating questions, you might begin to wonder if this could be an indication of Alzheimer’s disease or dementia. It is possible that these lapses are simply a normal part of aging or possibly signs of a mild cognitive impairment unrelated to Alzheimer’s disease or dementia. If these behaviors are a concern to you or your loved one, it is important to speak with your doctor in order to get an accurate diagnosis. Alzheimer’s ...
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Alzheimer’s and Communication Challenges

As Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia progress, symptoms may change and become more severe. In the early stages of the disease, a person with Alzheimer’s may still function independently, experiencing only minor difficulties with concentration or memory lapses. Over time, these issues worsen with increasing forgetfulness and confusion about people, places, dates and times. Another symptom that typically manifests over time is the patient’s increasing difficulty with communicating. ...
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Coping Strategies for Early Stages of Alzheimer’s Disease

In the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease, people experience a gradual loss of memory along with a slow decline in cognitive and reasoning skills. At the outset, this can be frustrating and challenging, as forgetfulness increases and tasks that were once routine become harder to manage. But some simple coping tips and strategies can help with daily tasks and extend the opportunity to live an engaged and independent life. Before employing any of these strategies, it is important to acknowledge ...
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Nutrition Tips for Alzheimer’s and Dementia

Getting proper nutrition can be a challenge for individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. Alzheimer’s patients may lose track of their mealtimes and skip meals or they may simply eat or drink less than they used to. People with Alzheimer’s also experience difficulties with eating as cognitive functioning declines. They may forget how to use utensils, not recognize some foods, have difficulty chewing or swallowing, find food choices confusing or lose their appetites due to...
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